The Risen Christ as Prophet, Priest, and King

In my study on the resurrection, I have focused in on the question: how does the resurrection of Christ serve his mediatorial offices of prophet, priest, and king? I have become convinced that the resurrection marks a crucial turning point in the effective completion of all three of these offices. I won’t take the space to unpack these passages, but what follows are some of the main texts that get me to this conclusion. The greatest act of Jesus’ priesthood was making atonement for sin on the cross. However, another aspect of Jesus’ priestly ministry is making intercession for believers…

What was the first thing Jesus did on Easter morning?

Apparently, he folded the grave cloth over his head. John 20:5-7: And stooping to look in, (the other disciple) saw the linen cloths lying there, but he did not go in. 6Then Simon Peter came, following him, and went into the tomb. He saw the linen cloths lying there, 7and the face cloth, which had been on Jesus’ head, not lying with the linen cloths but folded up in a place by itself. I don’t attach any significance to this, though verse 8 says that John believed when he saw it, possibly because no grave robbers would have bothered with…

A new kind of reality

I just read through each of the gospels’ accounts of Jesus’ resurrection and was very struck by how Jesus’ resurrected life is portrayed. One the one hand, the physicality of Jesus’ body and the continuity of his personhood is stressed in the strongest possible terms. In Luke 24, for example, when the disciples are wondering whether Jesus is a ghost, he reassures them, “see my hands and my feet, that it is I myself. Touch me, and see. For a spirit does not have flesh and bones as you see that I have” (v. 39; cf. John 20:27). And then,…

Quotes on Christ’s Resurrection (8)

“If the resurrection be fact, why not the incarnation? It is possible to isolate virtually all the other insignia of majesty in the synoptic tradition and pick them off one by one: the virgin birth, for example, the stilling of the tempest and the transfiguration. But if, in the last chapter of the story, we come across a fact such as the resurrection, then we have to roll back all our earlier skepticism and reinstate every pointer to the glory of this man, Jesus. The empty tomb is the Last Word (even though it has already been spoken); and what…

Quotes on Christ’s Resurrection (6)

After showing how different bodily resurrection was from other first century ideas about life after death, N.T Wright addresses the charge that belief in the resurrection is out-dated and pre-modern: “(It is) wrong to imply that the choice is between an ancient worldview and a modern (or even a postmodern) one. The ancient worldview of Homer, Plato, Cicero, and the rest had no room for resurrection either. What is at stake is the clash between a worldview that allows for a God of creation and justice and worldviews that don’t.” N.T. Wright, Surprised By Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and…

Quotes on Christ’s Resurrection (5)

This is a startling statement, the more you think about it, but seems to me justified on the basis of Acts 2:30-31 (King), Hebrews 7:16 (Priest), various verses in John, such as 8:28, 14:26, 16:7, 13 (Prophet): “If (Christ) did not rise from dead and return to His Father, He is neither Priest, Prophet, nor King, in the full sense of any of these terms.” William Milligan, The Resurrection of our Lord (MacMillan 1927), 152

Stott versus Calvin on the Saving Efficacy of Christ’s Resurrection

I’m a huge fan of John Stott’s The Cross of Christ, but I think a weakness of the book is its relative neglect of Christ’s resurrection. Not only does Stott have very little treatment of the resurrection throughout the book, but when he does discuss it, he explicitly downplays its importance. Especially telling is the section on pages 232-234, where he interacts with Michael Green’s The Empty Cross of Jesus on the question of the relative roles of Christ’s resurrection and his death within his saving work. Stott argues here that the soteriological role of the resurrection is limited to…

Quotes on Christ’s Resurrection (4)

I Corinthians 15:45: “Thus it is written, ‘The first man Adam became a living being;’ the last Adam became a life-giving spirit.” Richard Gaffin unpacks the meaning of “life-giving S/spirit” here: “Resurrection is here nothing less than the counterpart of creation. The resurrection of Christ is the beginning of the new and final world-order, an order described as spiritual and heavenly. It is the dawn of the new creation. It is the start of the eschatological age.” “As birth is characteristic of the old aeon, the sarkic world, so resurrection marks the beginning of the new aeon, the eschatological, pneumatic…